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Carry your Dead

A Performance by Regina Galindo

October 25, 2018

About the discussion

The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU and ANOTHER SPACE are pleased to announce Carry your Dead (Carguen con sus muertos), a performance by Regina José Galindo (b. Guatemala, 1974). Building on Galindo's earlier explorations of necropolitics and biopolitics, this new performance addresses the United States' long history of interventions in Latin America.

As Regina José Galindo states: "Provoked by the intervention of the U.S., the war in Guatemala lasted until the end of the 1990s. In 1996, a peace accord was signed, but in Guatemala there has never been any peace. In the 1980s, thousands of Guatemalans migrated to escape the horror of the war. Then came the gangs, the narco-conflicts, and the string of corrupt governments, which have generated a migratory crisis without precedent. In recent years, thousands of unaccompanied children and adolescents have crossed multiple borders in order to reach the US. Thousands more have arrived with their parents and have been cruelly separated at the border, held in prisons and detention centers across the country. U.S. policies have produced too much pain for millions of individuals around the world. There have been too many deaths." With this new work, Galindo’s first street performance in the United States, the artist aims to directly confront viewers with the underside of America’s foreign and migratory policies.

Carry your Dead (Carguen con sus muertos) was commissioned by ANOTHER SPACE and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU in conjunction with the exhibition The Second Sex. On view through October 31, 201 at ANOTHER SPACE, the exhibition examines the work of Latin American women artists from the Estrellita B. Brodsky Collection and includes a number of historic performances by Ana Mendieta, Lotty Rosenfeld, and Regina José Galindo that explore notions of memory and the relationship between the body, landscape, and politics.